Articles Posted in Workers’ Compensation

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Did you know that you could be entitled to workers’ compensation benefits in Mississippi while injured on the job, even if you are found to be at fault for speeding during an automobile accident? In a June 2016 decision (affirmed in July 2017) from the Mississippi Court of Appeals, a police officer for the City of Jackson was injured while speeding and on his way to an emergency call. His employer, the City, alleged that he was acting with a “willful intent to injure” himself, and based on this intent, that he should not be permitted to make a claim for workers’ compensation benefits. The case is City of Jackson v. Kearney Brown, No. 2016-WC-01164-COA.

The Mississippi Court of Appeals disagreed with the employer, stating that in the 10-0 decision mentioned above, that the police officer was entitled to benefits, regardless of his disputed fault. Workers’ compensation laws in the State of Mississippi cover injured workers who receive injuries by way of an accident arising out of the course and scope of their employment. However, workers’ compensation benefits will not be paid to an injured worker if they were injured by their willful intent. This test for willfulness is based on intent and whether the facts of the claim support a willful intent to injure oneself.

The attorneys for the employer above tried to argue that the police officer intentionally injured himself, which meant he should not be paid benefits owed to him pursuant to Mississippi law. The facts presented by the employee showed that he was injured by an accident, and therefore, he was entitled to his benefits.

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high-work-2-1231176Each year, workers’ compensation claims end up costing employers and their insurance companies tens of billions of dollars, according to Liberty Mutual Insurance’s Workplace Safety Index. Workplace accidents and injuries that caused employees to miss six or more days of work cost private employers nearly $60 billion in 2014. OSHA has also estimated that employers pay approximately $1 billion per week for workers’ compensation costs.

Workplace injuries cost employers billions annually in the form of workers’ compensation. These benefits include payment for medical bills, wages, and permanent impairment. In many states, including Tennessee, employers who regularly employ five or more employees are required to carry workers’ compensation insurance, subject to narrow exceptions in the law.

A workers’ compensation claim is distinguishable from a typical personal injury claim primarily because the injured worker does not always need to prove negligence on part of the employer in order to recover. This is why workers’ compensation is frequently referred to as a “no-fault” system. That being said, it is beneficial to hire an experienced workers’ compensation attorney to help navigate this unique field of law that is constantly evolving. For instance, workers’ compensation law in Tennessee drastically changed in 2014 when new legislation was enacted.

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construction-workers-1560042A unique issue that can arise in Tennessee workers’ compensation law is when employees are hired by contractors to perform work and get injured on the job. Many people in Tennessee work for temporary agencies or staffing companies, and they are then hired by a contractor for a limited duration to assist with a particular job or project. After sustaining an on the job injury, the employee will want to know which workers’ compensation insurance carrier will be required to provide benefits under Tennessee law.

Pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 50-6-106(5), an employer that regularly employs more than five (5) individuals must carry workers’ compensation insurance coverage. As a general rule, however, pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 50-6-113, a principal contractor or sub-contractor can be held equally liable to an injured employee as long as the employee was engaged in the subject matter of the contract to the same extent as the immediate employer. The purpose of this statute is to ensure employees are eligible to receive medical care and temporary and/or permanent disability benefits when injured within the course and scope of their employment, even if the employee’s immediate employer did not carry workers’ compensation insurance coverage. Benefits under this statute often are received through a principal contractor when an employee is hired through a temporary service and assigned to perform work with a specific employer or when an employee is employed through an employer with no workers’ compensation insurance coverage and the employee is assigned, directed, or contracted to perform work for a separate business/company.

Tenn. Code Ann. § 50-6-113 does not apply to the construction industry. Instead, we look to Tenn. Code Ann. § 50-6-901.  All individuals or entities in the construction industry are required to carry workers’ compensation insurance coverage, regardless of whether they employ more than five (5) individuals. However, specifically in the construction industry, an individual or entity may qualify to apply for exemption under Tenn. Code Ann. § 50-6-903. All applications for exemption must be reviewed and approved by the Tennessee Secretary of State. If approved, the individual or entity is then added to the Workers’ Compensation Exemption Registry.

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On November 16, 2016, a construction accident left one dead and another injured in Memphis, Tennessee. The accident occurred around 11:00 a.m. at the Cargill plant on President’s Island. According to reports, Cargill was in the process of tearing down buildings on its property. Officers from the Memphis Police Department arrived at the Cargill plant to investigate the accident, and the investigation revealed a wall collapsed during a demolition at the plant.

In a written statement, Cargill stated the deceased employee was a contractor hired to work at the plant. The worker who was injured is also a contractor, and he was taken from the scene to the hospital in non-critical condition. While the investigation will likely remain ongoing for quite some time, police have confirmed there did not appear to be any gas or chemical leaks that could further injure employees or those nearby.

In Tennessee, when a worker sustains injuries on the job, that person is typically able to recover certain benefits through the state’s workers’ compensation system. In most situations, instead of filing a lawsuit against the employer for negligence, Tennessee law states the injured worker’s remedy is making a workers’ compensation claim through their employer’s workers’ compensation insurance. Tennessee law requires employers with five or more employees to carry workers’ compensation coverage. Once coverage is established for the accident, the injured employee can be entitled to benefits such as medical bills, wage loss, and permanent impairment, once treatment is complete. Receiving these benefits promptly can be critical, especially if the workplace injury leaves the employee unable to return to work.

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Employees who work for an employer covered by the Tennessee Workers’ Compensation Act who have been injured while within the course and scope of their employment are entitled to receive medical care through the employer’s workers’ compensation insurance carrier. Tennessee law obligates the employer to provide an injured employee with medical benefits for any work-related injury. For medical care to be covered by the employer or workers’ compensation insurance carrier, the injury must arise primarily out of and in the course and scope of employment, and the employment must contribute more than 50% in causing the injury, considering all causes. The employee has the burden of establishing every element of his or her claim by a preponderance of the evidence.

In July 2014, the statutory definition of injury under the Tennessee Workers’ Compensation Act was updated to exclude aggravation of pre-existing conditions unless it can be shown, to a reasonable degree of medical certainty, that the aggravation is more than 50% caused by the employment.  The opinion of the authorized treating physician through the workers’ compensation insurance carrier is presumed correct on the issue of causation, but this presumption can be rebutted by a preponderance of the evidence.

In a Tennessee workers’ compensation claim, determining whether an injury is work-related is a decision to be made by a physician, not by the employer or insurance carrier. The Court of Workers’ Compensation Claims and the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board have held that as long as the employee comes forward with sufficient evidence to support a conclusion that their injuries may be work-related, the employer should provide medical care. From there, the authorized physician should make a determination as to whether the injury is causally related to the employment.